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The Six Great Sculptors of Greece

The Six Great Sculptors of Greece

Ancient sculptures have always held the modern man in awe! From gods and goddess, the ancient sculptures defined their age as one of force and magnanimous. Ancient Greece comes to the fore front whenever the subject of ancient sculptures is touched. Within Greece and its wide heritage of sculptors, there are six who are considered to be the fore-most in the art. Many sculptures were known for their famous works, sculpture being an important part of the Greek culture; but the six sculptors gave a new direction to the art of sculpting. This

 

Phidias

Phidias was an Athenian sculptor, painter and architecture and is considered one of the greatest sculptors in all of Ancient Greece. Although few facts are known about his life, he is believed to have lived from around 490 until 430 BC. Phidias is mainly known for his two enormous chryselephantine (gold and ivory) sculptures Athena in the Parthenon and his Zeus at Olympia.

Phidias’ colossal statue of Athena was housed in the Parthenon, known as the Athena Parthenon and recognized as the symbol of Athens, dating from 447 – 439 BC. Phidias’ second work was his gigantic statue of Zeus for the temple in Olympia. Dating from around 435 BC, the statue was counted as one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. The Athena Promachos, the Lemnian Athena, an Athena for Pellene and an Aphrodite for Elis are among the few great works from Phidias.

Myron

Myron was an Athenian sculptor who lived during the mid 5th century BC. He was born in Eleutherae but spend most of his life in Athens. He was believed to the student of Ageladas of Argos. Among his many works, the two most famous ones are the group of Athena and Marsyas originally standing on the Acropolis of Athens and the Discobolos (Discus Thrower). Myron was considered to be one of the most versatile and innovative of all Attic sculptors.

Polykleitos

Polykleitos was one of the well known Greek sculptors during the fifth and early 4th century BC. He was considered the most important sculptor of Ancient Greece next to his contemporaries Phidias and Myron. He was famous for his masterly bronze sculptor of athletes. Of his many works, Polykleitos two works are considered best. These were Diadumenus (Man tying on a Fillet), which was made during 430 BC and Doryphorus (Spear bearer) which was made during 450-440 BC and was latter being known as the Canon.

Praxiteles

Believed to be the native of Athens, Praxiteles was a famous sculptor who lived during the early 4th century. Son of the sculptor Cephisodotos, his recognition as a great sculptor is clear from the pictures of his sculptures which were engraved on Roman coins, as well as the descriptions given to us by writers such as Pliny the Elder and Pausanias. Few of his famous works are the marble statue of Hermes Carrying the Infant Dionysus which was made by Parian marble during the end of 4th century and Aphrodite of Cnidus which was considered as the best statue of the world by Pliny the Elder.

 Scopas

Scopas was a Greek sculptor and architecture of the Late Classical Period who lived during the 4th century BC. He was the successor to Polykleitos and contemporary of Praxiteles and Lysippus. He is known to introduce the powerful emotional expressions in the faces of his marble figures. Few of his notable works includes Maenad, the Pothoas and Ludovisi Ares.

 Lysippus

Lysippus is one of the well known sculptors of the Greek Classical Era along with Scopas and Praxiteles. He was one of the official sculptor of Alexander the Great. His works was characterized by life-like naturalism and slender proportions. According to roman writers, he has produced more than 1500 works all of them in bronze. Of these, not one has been preserved, nor is there a completely reliable copy. Lysippos is best known for his bronze sculpture and marble sculpture of athletes, heroes and Gods. Few of his famous works includes Apoxyomenos (The Scraper) and The Farnese Hercules.